Welcome! Central America Forum is a community resource for old hands (locals and foreigners) and recent arrivals to share information about living in and visiting the countries of Central America: Guatemala, Belize, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama.  If you want to live, retire, or visit and want to talk about residency, crime, culture, or find a trip advisor, this is your place to do it.  We welcome new members to join and contribute (even nicaliving refugees). To contribute, you can register, then create a blog or discussion topic, or post pictures, by clicking "Create content" in the left menu. For a list of "forum" discussion topics click "Our Forums" in the topmenu. For all recent posts, click "Recent Posts". New postings appear on the front page.
peterchristopher's picture

Two Months Down, Seven Months to Go

My wife Milyn and I have been here in Costa Rica for two months now. The first month, we lived in Grecia, house-sitting. The second month, we have been renting in Uvita, which is near Dominical and San Isidro PZ. Last week our daughter Rosalinda May was born, and so we are now three of us, living here in this beautiful place.

peterchristopher's picture

What Food Crops Should I Plant in Nicaragua?

Your Soil

In another forum, I received the following question: My husband and I have inherited a small farm, mostly coffee, and an area of about 3 acres where we plan to grow food. I am in need of advice on WHEN to plant and WHERE is the best place to find viable seeds or starts. My list includes tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, garlic, onions, sunflowers,corn, beans and maybe even rice, and also fruit trees... anybody had luck with any of these crops?? Our farm is just outside the town of Jinotepe [nicaragua], only 30 miles or so south of Managua. Maybe this topic is already being addressed--if so, please let me know where. Thank you!

So, here are some tips on growing things in Central America - a few things (sources of planting materials) are Nicaragua-specific, but most of it applies anywhere in Central America.

Fuel wood plantation near Diriamba?

Does anybody have information on fuel wood plantations in Nicaragua? I'm researching the viability of establishing a fuel wood plantation in Diriamba on 100 manzanas of land. Past experiences, consumer experiences, anything helps.

Varieties to Plant and Altitude in Central America

(previously titled Cultivating People in Central America)

One of the first things that people who start to live here in Central America consider is what to plant and how to cultivate it. And the list of possibilities is usually of vegetables commonly grown in temperate zones. Most of these can be grown but many will take a bit of special care. You are better off starting with easy-to-grow and more trouble-free tropical vegetables, such as winged beans, the taros like ñampi or tiquiste, yuca, jicama and so forth.

peterchristopher's picture

Tips on Gardening in Nicaragua and Elsewhere In Central America

The text concerning tips on gardening in Central America has been moved to What Food Crops Should I Plant in Nicaragua, in the Agriculture forum.

peterchristopher's picture

Milyn

in
Milyn

My dear wife Milyn was very happy today when there was some brief sunshine.

peterchristopher's picture

Notes From Russia - Trip to Tubelsky School for Self-Determination and Moscow International Film School

I finished rewriting my notes from my second trip to Russia, in 2003. Here are the entries.

Cascada

Cascada

Cascada in Punta Mala Arriba, Costa Rica. A great swimming hole.

peterchristopher's picture

Nicaragua Biting Yet Another Hand That Feeds It

Almost five years ago, I was in Central America for the first time. I wanted to find out which country would be best to choose as my home. In Nicaragua, I saw that the ex-President (Aleman) had been jailed for corruption. I saw optimistic views of the country from several websites. I visited Nicaragua, and I bought a farm and lived there for several years. When I had learned enough about the culture and saw that it was not advancing, but rather declining, I sold the farm. I now live in Costa Rica.

Nicaragua is a country where the economy depends on foreign cash. There is practially no manufacturing, practically no export of agriculture or natural materials. Nicaragua for thirty years has existed primarily on handouts it has received from three directions: the capitalists, the communists, and the expatriates (Nicaraguans living abroad, and foreigners living in Nicaragua).

Isadora Marie

in
Isadora Marie

Isadora Marie

Syndicate content