Nicaragua leads the way in renewable energy!

 Nicaragua has begun a series of investment projects that will supply the country with clean affordable renewable energy. There are three major projects: the first is already up and running which is 19 windmills in the south of Nicaragua generating up to 40 megawatts of energy. The windmills cost an estimated $90 million and will supply 6% of the country's total energy needs. Building a second set of 19 windmills is being considered by the project manager. 

The second project is Geothermal power plants in Nicaragua. Polaris already has a geothermal plant in San Jacinto Nicaragua which is currently producing 8.5 MW, with a phase II part that is scheduled to be completed in 2010 which will produce 72 MW. The San Jacinto plant has been estimated to be capable of producing 277 MW. The Polaris San Jacinto plant is one of the largest geothermal reservoirs being developed in the world. In addition Polaris has the rights to other geothermal reservoirs in Nicaragua with huge potential which it will soon begin construction in.

The third major project being developed is hydroelectric power. "The Nicaraguan government and Brazilian construction company Andrade Gutierrez have signed an agreement for financial and technical studies to be conducted on the Brito hydroelectric project. The technical studies will allow the partners to determine investment and financing costs for a project that is expected to generate 250 MW of electricity and in which Andrade Gutierrez is prepared to invest some $600 million. The project, which is to include the construction of two dams, will be built near the border with Costa Rica and will use the waters of Lake Nicaragua to regulate the reservoirs" The project is set to be completed by 2014.

With the completion of these three projects Nicaragua will be able to supply the majority of its energy consumption from renewable energy and also be able to export affordable clean energy to Central America.

Sources:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/01/02/nicaragua-wind-power-anot_n_154...

http://www.polarisgeothermal.com/eng/nicaragua.php

http://www.ticotimes.net/dailyarchive/2009_03/0302093.htm

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As I understand it,

As I understand it, Nicaragua gets something like 80% of its electricity from imported petroleum. It owes money all over the place for purchases of electricity from other countries. Much of this dates from its days under Soviet domination when it was being supplied with cheap petroleum. Costa Rica is actually using geothermal energy, has been for years. Most of its electricity comes from hydroelectric plants but it does use a little petroleum based electric power and may well use more as the recent earthquake damaged a new hydro plant in construction. As for wind generation, just look at all the wind powered generators around Arenal Lake! The projected dam on the San Juan river on the Costa Rican border probably will not work out. Presently Costa Rica has brought Nicaragua to face the courts in Holland for not respecting the treaty on navigation on the San Juan River. A project to flood some Costa Rican lands to the benefit of Nicaragua doesn't sound like it will be well received in Costa Rica. The title of this letter rings hollow! greating

Costa Rica's current renewable energy facilities

Here are a few more articles on Costa Rica's current renewable energy facilities and upcoming investments.

http://www.bnamericas.com/news/electricpower/Minister:_2009-21_public_power_investment_to_reach_US*9,23bn

http://ipsnews.net/news.asp?idnews=45994

Aguacate & Leon & Costa Rica

Thanks for the information did not know about the Aguacate dam, it unfortunate that it was destroyed at this rate Nicaragua will never get out of poverty.

 

 

Nicaragua's energy sources

As I understand it, Nicaragua gets something like 80% of its electricity from imported petroleum. It owes money all over the place for purchases of electricity from other countries. Much of this dates from its days under Soviet domination when it was being supplied with cheap petroleum.

Costa Rica is actually using geothermal energy, has been for years. Most of its electricity comes from hydroelectric plants but it does use a little petroleum based electric power and may well use more as the recent earthquake damaged a new hydro plant in construction. As for wind generation, just look at all the wind powered generators around Arenal Lake!

The projected dam on the San Juan river on the Costa Rican border probably will not work out. Presently Costa Rica has brought Nicaragua to face the courts in Holland for not respecting the treaty on navigation on the San Juan River. A project to flood some Costa Rican lands to the benefit of Nicaragua doesn't sound like it will be well received in Costa Rica.

The title of this letter rings hollow!

yeah I know the laws of

yeah I know the laws of physic, can't get out more then you put in.  here is a great web site that is a fourm on guys all over the world trying to prove that wrong. It's a great source on all kinds of ideas.  http://www.overunity.com/

Aguacate & Leon & Costa Rica

First, about Costa Rica: From http://insidecostarica.com/business/2009/february/09-02-06.htm you can read that "Ninety-eight percent of Costa Rica’s electricity already comes from renewable energy".

El Aguacate was a power station that ran for decades under Somoza in Carazo, powering Diriamba, Jinotepe, and San Marcos.  Once Daniel and his friends got their hands on it in the 80s, they thought it was easier to loot the copper from the generators than keep them in repair.

The Leon Biodiesel plant was donated by the Swiss government - which funded this obviously multimillion-dollar project a bit later than the Aguacate plundering.  Handed it over to the Nicaraguans, who shut it down and looted it.

You had really never heard about these?  You must be a young guy.  Ask Daniel.  He's probably got the parts in one of his warehouses, if he didn't sell them to China, that is.

re: Mark's devices and browns gas

Hey mark, don't forget, it's impossible to make something out of nothing.  You could use a power outlet to charge a lead acid battery or to charge a "water-split H & O" battery, but in either case when you later use the power, you'll have lost some in the conversion, not gained any.  Of course, if you need mobility like a car or golf cart, or need stability due to your power source being unreliable, it might be worth the inefficiency.

Mismanagement and destruction

I couldn't find any info on the Aguacate Hydro Project or the Leon Biodiesel plant, what exactly happened?

Does Costa Rica supply the majority of its electricity consumption from renewable energy?

 Im not sure about that, I

 Im not sure about that, I would imagine it is one of the polaris projects. The research that has been done in Nicaragua concerning geothermal energy, projects that Nicaragua has enough geothermal energy to sell power to all of Central America.

wonderful

I love reading about things like this. I have studied wind, solar and hydro, for my home. What it boils down to of course is money.  My power bill this month is 113.00, avg solar for my home 48k. and we have cloud cover most of the day.  we have wind,  but its not steady, and we have times when it feels like the roof is coming off.  One site I saw when I was looking into it, had a man who was buying and testing windmills from the many companies who sell and make them, everyone he bought he had problems with it and had to ship it back for them to repair.

Now that's ok if your in the states, maybe two states over from them, but could you count what it would cost me to ship it here and then a few months later have to ship it back?

I also have a small steam that winds around my home. It does run all year, but again the cost to set something up and the output it will give is really hard to make in worth doing.

I saw a new power source out last year, its called browns gas. I even found a company in china that were building the units, then last time I looked their site was gone.

browns gas is when you split the water, and leave the oxygen and hydrogen together and that gas can be burned the same way as a acetylene torch, only safer. also these units were making the gas as needed. no storage.  You plug the unit in a regular house outlet, add water and you have it.

Some neat things that these guys don't know how it works yet, is for one, the tip of your torch is always cool to the touch.  try that will a acetylene torch and momma will have to tie your shoes for you for a week. the other thing that is really neat is this gas changes its own temp. depending on what it is trying to cut. yeah I know thats a hard one to believe.

now to me, I would think you could hook up this gas to run a power station which in turn you would take the power needed to make the gas. all you need to add is the water.  need more power, you get a bigger unit that makes more gas.

Renewable energy in Nicaragua

I was speaking to a high ranking government official in Managua last fall and he spoke about a plan to tap into the vast geo-thermal enerygy that Nicaragua has.  Do you know anything about that?

We really need to get on

We really need to get on about the business of becoming energy independent. This past year and the record gas prices played a huge part in our economic meltdown and seriously damaged our economy and society.We keep planning to spend BILLIONS on bailouts and stimulus plans.Bail us out of our dependence on foreign oil. Make electric plug in car technology more affordable. It cost the equivalent of 60 cents a gallon to drive an electric plug in car. The electric could be generated from wind or solar. If all gasoline cars, trucks, and SUV's instead had plug-in electric drive trains, the amount of electricity needed to replace gasoline is about equal to the estimated wind energy potential of the state of North Dakota. Get with it! Utilize free sources such as wind and solar. Stop throwing away money on things that don't work. Invest in America and it's energy independence. Create cheap clean energy, create millions of badly needed green collar jobs. Put America back to work. It is a win-win situation. We have to become more proactive citizens, educate ourselves and demand our elected officials move this country forward into the era of energy independence. Jeff Wilson's new book The Manhattan Project of 2009 Energy Independence NOW outlines a plan for America to wean itself off oil. We need a plan and we need it now! www.themanhattanprojectof2009.com
 

credit earned

You certainly deserve at least some credit for the accomplishment of the windmills.  Perhaps it makes up for the mismanagement and destruction of the El Aguacate Hydro project and the Leon Biodiesel plant by the FSLN.  I think I disagree with the title of your post, however: isn't Costa Rica far ahead in implementation of ecological electricity generation?

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